How to Attract Red-Bellied Woodpecker

How to Attract Red-Bellied Woodpecker

BE AWARE THAT HABITAT TYPE MORE THAN ANY OTHER FACTOR, WILL IN MOST CASES, DICTATE THE SPECIES OF BIRD THAT VISIT YOUR PROPERTY. 

Description: A common eastern woodpecker, the Red-Bellied Woodpecker lives in eastern forests and woodlands, it eats insects, spiders, acorns, and other tree nuts, along with wild fruit. It will however venture into backyards to eat from feeders, where it prefers sunflower seed, suet, and peanuts. Red-Bellied Woodpecker nest in cavities of dead trees. 

Overview

Identification:

  • Medium-sized woodpecker
  • Distinctive black and white barred back, whitish-gray underparts, belly is not red - but has subtle tints of orange, red eyes. Male has red crown and nape, female has red nape and small red patch at base of beak. 

Habitat:

  • Open Woodland
  • Forest
  • Backyards

Eating Habits:

  • Primarily Insects - especially wood-boring insect larvae 
  • Also: seeds, nuts
  • Some fruit in fall-winter

Nesting:

  • Cavity in dead trees

Top Ways to Attract Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Sunflower Seed     Suet     Peanuts     Forest/Open Woodland     Dead Trees

Trees & Shrubs that Attract Red-Bellied Woodpecker

         American Elderberry (Fruit)     Ash (Insects, Nesting)     Beech (Nut)     Black Willow (Nesting)      Crabapple (Fruit)     Eastern White Pine (Seeds, Nesting)                         Elm (Nesting)     Dead Trees (Insects, Nesting)     Flowering Dogwood (Fruit)     Hackberry (Fruit)     Hickory (Nut)     Maple (Insects, Nesting)                            Northern Bayberry (Fruit)      Oak (Insects, Acorn)     Red Mulberry (Fruit)     Serviceberry (Fruit)    Wild Cherry (Fruit)

Flowers & Vines that Attract Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Pokeweed (Fruit)     Sunflower (Seeds)     Virginia Creeper (Fruit)     Wild Grape (Fruit)

Attracting Red-Bellied Woodpecker with a Bird Feeder

Feeder Type:     Fruit-Feeder     Hooper     Platform     Suet Feeder     Tube

Feed:     Cracked Corn     Halved Orange     Mealworms     Peanut     Suet     Sunflower Seed